Q and A with David Lawson of Imperial Terrain!

General

Image result for imperial terrain cochin

David Lawson is the man behind Imperial Terrain, which I’m sure most of us are familiar with, and he’s the man behind their newest project: The Cochin Industrial Kickstarter Campaign. We thought it was a prime chance to ask Dave some questions in regard to this awesome, world building project as it has taken the terrain world by storm! (at this moment it’s over $25K in support!) Let’s jump into that interview, here:


Q: Good morning, Dave! As a Star Wars Legion fanatic I know what Imperial Terrain is. For new players wondering: what is Imperial Terrain?

A: Imperial Terrain is a Sci-Fi themed terrain shop focused on 3d print files and printed terrain pieces that work very well for wargames like Legion and RPG’s. I play Legion when I have the time (Shawn Morris only beat me by one place at Gencon) and enjoy being a member of the growing community. We support the list builders, invader league, and even small tournaments when we can.

Q: Now that we know what Imperial Terrain is there’s of course the main reason for this interview. The Cochin Industrial Kickstarter Campaign! Was this something in the works for a while? What separates this Kickstarter from anything Imperial Terrain has ever done before? 

A:I have been working on the setting and files for probably 2 months before the launch of the Kickstarter. To do it right is a TON of work, and I’m learning that more and more each day the Kickstarter progresses.  From art, concept work, modeling, partnering, etc. We could have easily done a set of files and released it on our store, but then I wouldn’t have gotten 1/10th of the amazing ideas / feedback that have gone right back into the files. I have already updated most of the core files from backer feedback. Let alone, working with folks like Dominic, the Terrain Studio, Skullforge, etc.

Q: For those of us unfamiliar with Kickstarter campaigns, can you walk us through how each pledge tier functions and how all of the goals reached and still attainable goals yet to be unlocked work? 

A:Sure, it really boils down to about 3 questions.
Do you have a 3d printer and just want the files to make the terrain yourself? Go with the $40 Pledge.
Do you not own a 3d printer and want to buy already printed pieces that get delivered to you? Go with the $60 Pledge, you will also be able to add onto your order after the Kickstarter is over via a Pledge Manager.
Do you want both some printed stuff and the files because down the road you might get your own printer? Go with the $80 Pledge Level. Surprisingly this has been the most popular option!
As of this morning, we have unlocked 8x Stretch Goals. Every time the funding level surpasses dollar value the stretch goal is locked at, the stretch goal is unlocked and the files will be available to backers. Physical pledge folks will be able to buy those models printed at a special price down the road.
We still have 4x Stretch Goals left and I will continue to add more as I have plenty of ideas!

Q: As someone watching Cochin keep evolving and completing said goals I have to ask: was this crazy amount of support and success expected or are you exceeding expectations? With this success, do you see yourself launching another Kickstarter in the near future after this campaign is settled?

A: We are massively exceeding expectations which I think speaks to the setting, the work the team did, the flexibility of the terrain, etc. As far as another Kickstarter down the road, I want to do something different…not from only a setting/theme point of view but also from different production methods as well. I will definitely be working with other awesome artists again to make more than just “Here is 100 STL Files”, I know people want alot of bang for their buck, but to me its about creating an awesome setting and giving ideas, hobby tips, instruction, artwork, etc.

Q: Another big name in the terrain building for Star Wars Legion is the Terrain Studio. Shawn and crew are part of the Kickstarter with Imperial Terrain, as we can see with some awesome videos on the world building you all created together. It’s fantastic as someone involved with the community to see the two companies work together. Did you approach Shawn with the idea and how did this all come to fruition? 

A: I did approach Shawn awhile back as these things take a bit of time to make happen. I’ve known him since the game came out and always respected/admired his work and skill. I was never concerned about sending him a massive amount of product and really letting him go hog wild with it. He was great during the process, insuring he was meeting my vision and coordinating frequently. Folks will see the demo board at LVO and Adepticon this year.

Q: On the design side of things, Cochin seems to take some idea from prior Imperial Terrain pieces and some of its own ideas and forms it into one. Such as the pegs to make it modular and interchangeable. Can you give us some insight on the workings of these designs and how you got them to where they are here in the Kickstarter? Going off said design insights, why go with an Industrial style setting? 

A:We rely heavily in the Cochin setting on the OpenLOCK connection system from Printable Scenery. I needed something proven, that works quickly and without much hassle. We made some very minor changes to accommodate our designs and were off to the races. Most of the models have been through many, many iterations which I find is my best way to work instead of trying to sit down and finish it in one sitting.
Industrial style is frankly one of my favorites. There is alot of influences here from abandoned factories, shipyards, stuff from the Star Wars settings like Corellia, abandoned Coruscant and others. You can find things in the current day world that we dont see often, such as shipyards, and turn them into a very cool setting for our wargames.

Q: Any idea if Cochin will be used at any upcoming events such as Warfaire Weekend (November 8th and 9th) or the Las Vegas Open (January 24-26)? 

A: Warfaire weekend, probably not but definitely LVO. I still have to decided if I can make it up to play for Warfaire!

Q: Last but not least: Star Wars Legion is coming out with the two new factions very, very soon. Is there any kind of sneak peek of ideas you may have going forward for Imperial Terrain in conjunction with these two new factions and world building? We know the community loves teasers and speculation! 

A: We have already released our Marin City set and some Rock Scatter that would help those folks build some interesting boards. Moving forward I think you will see some new items that will help players better immerse themselves in their wargames!

We want to thank Dave and the crew so much for letting the Jedha Journal do this Q and A interview with them! I can’t recommend them enough. I am, personally, a member of their monthly STL program and Mike has been a customer of theirs in the past on way too many occasions. The quality of their files and prints are top notch. If you join their monthly program there is a Facebook group that Dave and crew update regularly. Not to mention what the interview was all about: their Kickstarter, which is just fantastic stuff. They have set up one of the best Legion-related businesses out there, and again I cannot recommend them enough!

-Zach

Creature Trooper Oddities

General, Strategy

This may come as a surprise based on the amount of discussion that has already occurred, but Tauntaun Riders have only been out in the wild for a month, and the Dewbacks delayed release has meant that only a small number of people own them. Despite this, a number of interesting and unique movement and engagement scenarios and rules questions have arisen. Today, I would like to very briefly discuss some of the common situations that I have run into, and provide a concise, clear resolution for them.

This is meant to be a very quick overview (perhaps to get you ready for Invader League Season 4?) in which I will list and go over some of the relevant rules from the Rules Reference Guide, before diving into some Tabletop Simulator created examples, graciously provided to us by Sploosh (you can find him on the Legion Discord). Please feel free to reach out to Zach or myself specifically if you have any questions, and be sure to join the Discord or Facebook and ask the community. As a fair warning, today’s article is fairly straightforward, to the point, and slightly dry in nature, but will clarify a number of commonly asked questions.

Lets first take a look at some important creature trooper rules. These can be found in the rules reference guide under the headings Creature Troopers, Displacement, Creature Trooper Movement, Reposition, and Standard Move, on pages 29, 35, 50,  59, and 65.

  • Creature Troopers, pg 29 
    • Creature troopers cannot be displaced. 
    • Trooper and Ground Vehicle minis cannot move through creature troopers
  • Displacement, pg 35
    • If a unit leader was displaced, it must be placed within range 1 of its original position.
  • Creature Trooper Movement, pg 50
    • A creature trooper mini cannot move through or displace a trooper mini that is engaged. 
    • A creature trooper mini cannot move through or displace emplacement trooper minis. 
    • A creature trooper mini cannot move through or displace other creature trooper minis. 
    • While engaged, creature trooper units do not have to withdraw to perform moves and can displace non- creature, non-emplacement trooper units with which they are engaged while doing so.
  • Reposition, pg 59
    • When a unit with the reposition keyword is being moved by an opponent, such as via the Force Push upgrade card, the reposition keyword can be used by the opponent during that move. 
    • Standard Move, pg 65
    • All speed-x moves are standard moves. 
    • Pivot, Reverse, Climb, Clamber, Embark, and Disembark are not standard moves. 

That’s quite a bit of text isn’t it? The main things to take note of, and the examples we will explore shortly, are that creature troopers cannot move through other creature troopers, emplacement troopers, and ground vehicles. Additionally, force push cannot be used to reverse a creature trooper, but you can trigger reposition with them.

Let’s take a quick look at some examples.

You are Luke Skywalker in this example. Luke is engaged with the tauntaun currently, and is attempting to escape the melee. There are three ways for Luke to escape: withdraw, force push, or kill the tauntaun. Withdraw and elimination are pretty straightforward, so let’s focus on the force push. Force Push reads that you “perform a speed-1 move with that unit, even if it is engaged.” This wording is important because all speed-1 moves are standard moves, and reverse is defined as not being a standard move (pg. 65). Therefore, Luke cannot force push the tauntaun backwards. This means that the only other force push option is to actually displace Luke himself, because the tauntaun’s base will cross over Luke’s base, even if reposition is triggered from force push. Per the displacement rules (pg. 35), because you are performing the movement with the tauntaun model, your opponent places Luke within range 1 of his current position, potentially putting him in a dangerous location.

In this example, the red tauntaun has moved into position to block the blue tauntaun’s forward movement. Creature troopers cannot move through other creature troopers (pg. 50), and therefore the blue model only has one option: reverse. If you look closely at the models, even if the blue model pivots the full 90 degrees to its right, a small portion of the base would still move through the red base, making the movement illegal. This can be seen in the following graphic.

This example can be the most difficult one to resolve because the smallest sliver counts as a movement through another model, and sometimes this situation can be unclear and result in a judge needing to be called.

In this example, both models have their forward notches locked inside of their opponent’s notch, resulting in a stalemate. Despite the complex looking nature of this engagement, it is actually one of the simplest examples. Neither model can pivot in any direction without crossing through the other’s base, and this leaves only one option again: reverse.

In contrast to the linked bases in the example above, this melee does not have as many restrictions. Both units are able to clearly reverse, and also have the ability to pivot to escape. However, in order to ensure that no base overlap occurs, the full 90 degree pivot must be taken, and a straight movement must follow. Anything less than the full 90 degree pivot would result in the movement template being dragged across the opponent’s mini’s base.

As a bonus, let’s take a quick look at a hot button detachment ruling: when deploying the detachment unit, can you place the emplacement anywhere within range 1, including on top of a building? The short answer? Yes.

As goofy as this may seem, we currently do not have any language or text preventing a MK2 or Mortar from being deployed on top of a height 3 building, as long as it is within a speed one movement distance from its assigned corp unit. While it’s possible that this is clarified at a later date, there is already a tournament precedence from NOVA to allow this occurrence.

One final note: Do you like big archways over looking the water? Do you want to visit the current city that (unforunately) holds the Stanley Cup ? Have you watched War Corgi on Youtube and want to meet a Legion celebrity along with Legion’s top judge Brendon Franz? Well, I have the place for you! Join Brendon and crew at Warfaire Weekend this November 8th and 9th for the second of three Grand Championships this Legion tournament season! Earn cool swag, win a seat to come join Zach and I at next year’s High Command (aka Worlds), and receive free airfare if you win the whole thing! Sign ups are here.

-Mike

Faction Identity: Grand Army of the Republic and Confederacy of Independent Systems

General

Imperialmarch

“Only begun, this Clone War has.”- Master Yoda

It’s time to follow up on last week’s post about the faction identities of the Rebels and Imperials with the two new factions coming to Star Wars Legion: The Grand Army of the Republic and the Confederacy of Independent Systems. Of course, like the simpletons we are, we are going to reference them as Clones (GAR) and Droids (CIS), respectively.

What an absolutely exciting time to be a Star Wars Legion player. I think a lot of us can say that the prequels, when they first came out, really were a let down for the most part. Sure, Revenge of the Sith was actually really good and may have saved the trilogy; but overall it wasn’t what we all expected. However, the Clone Wars television show may have saved the era. After watching the Clone Wars, I have a new found respect for the prequels and enjoy them a heck of a lot more than I did say 5-10 years ago. Why is this all relevant you ask? Fantasy Flight decided to go with the cartoon version of General Kenobi, with his clone armor look, which makes me think they will use the show for reference going forward. (Please, give us Cad Bane!) People around our age (28 & 25) may find themselves a lot more excited for Clones versus the older, original trilogy crew (Caveat: Original trilogy is my favorite and always will be) and that’s okay! No matter what age you are or whether you decide to pick up the Clone Wars box as an existing player there’s one thing that’s for certain: we should see an influx of new players once these core sets release. It’s absolutely, positively the biggest thing for Legion to date. Between the assumed influx of players, the new plastic sprues, and the addition of two brand new factions; this is a big moment for Legion as a whole. How we react to the new players and factions is the key to this game’s success and it should be with open arms. All that aside, let’s talk about the faction identities before I ramble on even more!

The Grand Army of the Republic

First and foremost: I want to make sure that this doesn’t scare new players from playing the Clones. The Clones are going to be a difficult faction to master out of the gate. I don’t play Warhammer, but for reference everyone seems to compare them to the Space Wolves faction. What I can tell you is that Clones will be a highly elite faction that pays the premium for their elite status. Let’s go over the Pros and Cons to give you a better idea as to why they may be a difficult army that needs a lot of finesse.

Pros

  • Elite Units
  • Weapon Options
  • Red Saves
  • Fire Support
  • Token Passing

If you are an existing player, and perhaps more so a Rebels player, have you ever said to yourself, “I wish I had a Z6 unit but with red saves!”? Well, have I got news for you. Now for the new players reading this asking “What the heck does this mean?”, lets talk about it in more depth.

The reason Clones are considered elite units is because the have the benefit of the stronger Rebel trooper attack dice while also rolling the stronger Stormtrooper defense dice. For reference: Stormtroopers roll white on offense versus Rebel troopers’ black and Stormtroopers roll red saves on defense versus Rebel Troopers throwing white defense dice. Black attack dice and red defense dice give the Clones the benefit of having fairly reliable dice (50% each) on both sides of the game, thus making them the elite army faction. Of course, it comes with the price of being the most expensive army option in the game, which we’ll get to in the Cons section.

Another aspect of the Clones being the elite faction comes with the heavy weapon options. Rebels have the Z6 as the most common heavy weapon and the Imperials have the DLT-19 as their most common heavy weapon. Clones? They have the option of both the Z6 and the new (old?) DC-15 as their heavy weapon. The Z6 rolls six white dice on offense while the DC-15 rolls two reds with Critical 1 and can shoot at range four. This is another great advantage for the Clones, however both weapons do slightly cost more for the brothers from Kamino versus the Galactic Civil War era faction counterparts. It pays to be the best.

A new mechanic in Legion is Fire Support. Right now, as this article is written, the Rebel Veterans and Imperial Shoretroopers are debuting this new mechanic, which presents a small taste of what is to come. Fire Support, as written on the card, is: When another friendly unit performs a ranged attack, if you have a face up order token, each mini in your unit may add an eligible weapon to the attack pool. If you do, flip over your order token facedown. Limit 1 Fire Support per attack pool. What this does, essentially, is give you a crazy dice pool at the cost of an activation.

Presentation1

An example I can give you is that Clone unit A moves and shoots at Target X. Clone unit B, with a face up order token, has range and is in line of sight on Target X and they decide to fire support. Let’s say in this example Clones A have a DC-15 and Clones B have a Z6, you went from rolling four black dice/two red dice to a dice pool of eight black dice/six white dice/two red with Critical 1. As previously noted, this does take away an activation from your Clone army, but if you can take an enemy activation off the board it’s extremely strong.

Another new mechanic for the Clone Wars release is the sharing of tokens between the units marked as Clone Troopers. Clones are essentially brothers and they work together as if they are one, right? Well FFG has encapsulated this pretty well with this mechanic and continues to do their best with making Legion thematically awesome. Straight out of the Star Wars Legion Rules Reference Guide:

» A clone trooper unit may spend the green tokens of a
friendly clone trooper unit at range 1 and in line of sight
as if they were their own.

» Green tokens include aim, dodge, standby, and
surge tokens.

Surge tokens are a new token type entering Legion and how they work is that you may spend these surge tokens on your dice. For example, say you roll three defense dice and you get two blocks and a surge. If you have a surge token, you may spend that surge to turn that die into a block. The fun part, obviously, is the fact that the Clones get to share those tokens. This is going to be absolute INTEGRAL to the faction and it’s identity. This is part of the reason I think Clones will be difficult to master, as this will take a lot of finesse to figure out, but golly it is good. We’ll touch on the tactics of this mechanic later on in some detail! To the Cons!

Cons

  • Army Cost
  • Activation Count
  • Fire Support
  • Ways to deal with Suppression

As you can see, some of these cons echo and may seem redundant. However, it’s important to touch upon all these aspects even if it is repetitive. As you learn to build lists with Clones you notice something: you hit 800 points real, real quick. Learning ways to maximize your points is going to be crucial in order to successfully run the Grand Army of the Republic. Choose your points and upgrades wisely.

Due to the high cost of the Clones, you’ll notice that your activation count will be lower than  Rebels and Imperials. Right now, the Civil War factions hover around ten activations, whereas the Clones will probably come in at around eight or nine. This is why they have Fire Support, though, as it will help them even the activation counts as quickly as possible. Learning how to play while down activations is something that needs to be highly considered when choosing to play GAR.

Speaking of being down activations and Fire Support….why is Fire Support both a Pro and a Con? Well, because you will most likely have fewer activations from the outset of the game, using Fire Support in the wrong situations can lower your count even further. Picking and choosing your spots to use fire support is going to make or break games. You can’t use it too often, you’ll allow your opponent to run amok even if you start deleting units off the board. This plays into the finesse aspect that we’ll touch upon in the tactics next.

A major concern out of the gates for GAR is going to be suppression mitigation. When the core set comes out the only two ways to remove suppression are going to be from Hope, a new Force card that gives Inspire 1, and Strict Orders. Strict Orders allows you to remove a suppression from a unit with a face up order token rather than roll rally dice. Another good thing is that fire support could help GAR avoid panic and manage their suppression. What I mean is that if a unit has a faceup order token and they start piling up suppression tokens….fire support with that unit. Because fire support takes place outside of a unit’s activation, it will ensure that unit doesn’t panic because they will completely skip the rally phase of the round.

Strategy

Presentation1

An example of a lone Clone Trooper mini, safely tucked behind a barricade, passing its standby for a full unit to use

It’s pretty hard writing about a faction I have yet to play, but I intend to give you the best advice I can give you here. There are some easy strategy options on the surface. You’re going to want to play Obi Wan somewhat defensively rather than aggressive, which is completely opposite any other lightsaber wielder currently in the game. Obi Wan has a plethora of ways to get green tokens on the Clones around him, and that’s super relevant and leads to our next point. You want to keep Clones close together. You want to be in line of sight and in range 1 of other Clone units as much as you can due to the token passing. As I spoke about in the Rebels article piece last week, Rebels rely on gimmicks. Well, so does the Clone army. The ability to pass those tokens is going to be crucial. Something you could see happen quite a bit could be some Standby token shenanigans. A unit in the back moves and standbys while being in range 1 of a unit in front of them, then that unit has an enemy unit move near them that would trigger a stand by had they had the token on them. News flash to your opponent, they actually have that stand by token thanks to the Clones having this ability to pass. That might be a super corner case or a niche instance that’s in my head, but it might also have some gumption behind it. Taking a shot on your front lines but have a dodge on your back lines? Here you go, brother! It’s funny to think Clones can pass dodge tokens when they have the DNA of Jango Fett, ya know the guy who definitely did not dodge Mace Windu’s purple lightsaber.

Image result for mace windu looking at jango

Again,I think the trickiest thing will be how and when to use fire support. It’s going to be an extreme learning curve for all players on how to play this faction and you should not get discouraged if it takes several games for you to feel comfortable running them. Theed wasn’t built in a day! No matter what you do: have fun with the shiny new toys!

-Zach

Image result for CIS army

The Confederacy of Independent Systems (CIS)

Speaking of shiny toys, the CIS faction officially releases to the general public this September. Seeing as it’s still August, much of this information will be gleaned from proxying, TTS play, and reports from those who purchased a GenCon Core Set. The CIS function in a min/max manner, which means that they have the cheapest of the cheap and the cream of the crop in one army. Interestingly enough, many of the droid army’s advantages and disadvantages are two sides of the same coin. As you will see, the CIS appear to be quite user friendly, and contains more advantages than disadvantages. However, just like Anakin blowing up the Trade Federation hub at the end of Episode I, when things go wrong, they go wrong quickly. Let’s dive in.

Pros

  • Cheap units
  • Elite units
  • Order control

The first advantage for the CIS is their cheap corp units. And when I say cheap, I mean 6 points a droid model cheap. And when you can stack eight of these models into a single squad for 62 points (including the heavy weapon), you can quickly build an army corp of 48 models. It takes most opposing units a long time to chew through 48 wounds of just corp units. There are two other advantages to having cheap corp units: disposability and list building space. Inexpensive, numerous corp units present an interesting dilemma for an opponent; do they spend the time trying to shoot through 48 healths worth of 6 point models, or do they focus on the opponents major pieces? However, this is a double edged sword, as ignoring 48 models can lead to a player being overwhelmed by sheer numbers for objective scoring.

The second advantage is list building space, with 6 properly outfitted corp squads coming in at roughly 392 points, leaving over half your points available for other units. This is in stark contrast with the phase 1 clone troopers, where a set of 6 outfitted troopers comes to roughly 480 points. This extra space is heavily needed for the CIS, because their commanders and heavy units pack quite a punch to the points wallet; General Grievous begins at 175, the AAT at 170, and Count Dooku at 205. However, these units are expensive for a reason.

For the most part, expensive units in Legion tend to be elite, and the three main heavy hitters for the CIS fit the bill. Lets begin with General Grievous. Clocking in at 175 points base, a fully outfitted Grievous can walk onto the table at 208 points, a whopping quarter of your army. However, he packs quite a punch, with the ability to move across difficult terrain at will, and perform climb actions for free with his Scale ability. This ability proves useful when preparing to annihilate the enemy with his 1-pip command card, Trained in Your Jedi Arts. This card allows Grievous to perform an attack, with a special weapon, against every enemy unit within Range 1 of himself at the end of his activation. Oh, did I mention it’s Suppressive? Yeah, I’d be running from this monster too.

Image result for grievous 4 arm pose

Count Dooku and the AAT are no slouches either. A fully tooled up Dooku can max out at a ridiculous 250 points, putting him on par with the Emperor, his old master, in Legion scale. Dooku possesses two weapons with Pierce, both at range and in melee, and comes with a new keyword called Makashi Mastery, allowing him to reduce his pierce levels in order to remove the opponent’s ability to use Impervious or Immune: Pierce. The gentleman is a duelist, and he wants you to know it. The droid AAT tank begins its existence at 170 points, before adding on weapons to maximize its Arsenal ability. Capable of throwing multiple red dice out to Range 4 with High Velocity, which negates an opponent’s ability to spend a dodge token, there is no hiding from the guns of this tank. Clocking in with 9 Health, Armor, and red dice saves, it will take quite an effort to bring down this assault vehicle.

Presentation2

One of the most obvious advantages to playing the CIS army is their unique form of order control. The B1 Droid unit contains a keyword called Coordinate: Droid Trooper. This keyword allows a B1 droid to issue an order to another droid trooper whenever they are issued one themselves; effectively creating a chain of orders throughout your corp units. This ability is incredibly useful, and allows for a number of turns of perfect activation control for your army; let’s focus in on that.

Say you open up your core sets and build a list; let’s take Grievous, six B1s and two droidekas. Turn 1 you decide to play Assault, the generic 3-pip card. You issue orders to both droidekas, and one to a single B1. This B1 uses its coordinate ability and passes along the chain of other corp to get six total corp orders out. This leaves just the token for Grievous in your bag, allowing you to activate any unit whenever you want. Not bad right? You can do this multiple times per game. Order control is one of the fundamental skills that requires mastery to be elite in Legion, and the CIS army provides a number of shortcuts to attaining perfect control over your forces.

Cons

  • Top heavy reliance
  • Potential chaos
  • Poor dice

As I mentioned earlier, many of the CIS’s advantages also reflect their greatest disadvantages. While the droid corp units are numerous and inexpensive, they tend not to do a whole lot offensively. This leaves the burden of enemy unit removal to their heavies and commanders, which has two main downsides. The first is that it’s predictable. While Grievous may be hard to pin down, it becomes apparent very early on where he wants to unleash his trophy lightsabers. Once this target area is identified, the defending player can begin to prepare a response with the rest of their army in an attempt to mitigate or even prevent his assault. The second downside is dice variance. When most of your points are tied up in one unit, a single bad roll can wreck even the best plans. If a defensive roll ends up cold and Dooku drops to a single shot, the CIS are often left hanging in the breeze.

We touched on the coordinate keyword possessed by the B1 droids earlier, but that is not the only keyword they possess. Remember when I said action control is essential? Well, if the opponent denies your droids an order token, your activation control turns to activation chaos. They also contain AI: Attack. This keyword means that if a droid trooper does not have a face up order token, their first action must be an attack. That exhaustible, Range 4 rocket launcher you were saving for the advancing enemy tank? You just shot at an enemy squad in heavy cover with it and only it. Not only is this a negative as it derails your plans, but it also means you cannot move to eliminate cover first or take an aim, as the attack must be your first action. Keeping orders on your droids, especially your B1 corps, is essential to any kind of success with the faction. However, there is one small silver lining. If the unit does not have a face up order token, but cannot legally perform an attack, it keeps both actions as normal.

The final major disadvantage to the droids is their generally poor dice pools, especially in their basic corp units. For example, the B1 units throw both white dice for attack and defense, and neither die surges. Many of the other units do not have any native surges either, and if you do not play your command cards or green tokens correctly, they can lag behind the game’s other units in terms of dice consistency. Even the Droidekas and the AAT do not possess enormous dice pools, but rather rely on strength in numbers to overwhelm enemy defenses.

Strategy

We’re going to keep this short and sweet today. The general concept of the CIS army involves keeping your corp units within a range 1 ball of each other while your commanders and heavy units lead the charge from the frontlines. As touched on early, by maintaining that link between your corp units, you are able to issue orders with near perfect accuracy to your army, allowing you to react and provoke with any unit at any time, eliminating the luck aspect of drawing a token from your bag. Crucially, this also means that you will not be activating a high impact, elite unit at an inopportune moment. Seeing as most major pieces for the CIS are over 200 points, leaving them exposed is a quick way to certain defeat. However, these pieces are capable of single-handedly winning you matches, and for a more coherent, visual example of this I invite you to watch the TTS stream between TalkPolite and DrRizzle from the most recent round of the Yavin Base Team League. In this match, we are fortunate enough to be able to watch TalkPolite keep his corp in a cohesive ball, maximize his order control, and unleash chaos with General Grievous.

-Mike

We hope that over the last two weeks we have been able to give you some insight in the basic concepts of each of the four factions available in Star Wars Legion, and potentially provide some reasons for playing each faction. As of the current standing, the game is still quite balanced, and all four factions have a reasonable chance of victory when they deploy to the table. As remove further and further towards Worlds 2019, each of these factions should begin to splinter from their mirror faction and four cohesive identities and play styles will emerge. We as a community are currently looking for the next wave of players to establish themselves as the new experts on the GAR and the CIS, are you willing to step up to the challenge? Until next week, thanks for reading!

-Mike and Zach

Faction Identity: Rebels and Imperials

General

Image result for Rogue One scarif

Mike and I decided now would be a good time to try and tackle all four factions and how they function. With the Clone Wars looming around the corner, what faction works for you? This is going to be more geared towards beginners and newcomers to the game but, hopefully, everyone finds this useful!

Rather than breaking down unit by unit, which we have done in the past in simplistic ways, we want to just go over the basics for each faction. How do they function? How easy are they to play? What should I expect if I run this faction and why? The game of Star Wars Legion as we know it evolves each and every week, or so it seems, and this is the biggest change. Let’s start with the two old factions first and then step into new pastures. (Naboo perhaps?)

The Rebel Alliance

For some strange reason there seems to be this general view that Rebels are not good or competitive versus the Empire. Well, as an avid Rebels player, I can assure something: Rebels are very good. Here’s the thing about Rebels: they’re very difficult to play. I’m fairly new to war-gaming, like as in this is my first ever game and I just started playing Legion this past January, but I decided to go for the Rebels. I’m a big Luke Skywalker fan, have been my entire life, and that was the draw for me, but it certainly was a learning curve. Lets dive into some pros and cons to playing Rebels and why they might be for you!

Pros

  • Great characters that, ultimately, can change the game
  • Appeal of the classic characters and units with a mix of new 
  • Strong offensively (The Z-6 may be finicky but it’s good)
  • Gimmicks that help win games 

Luke Skywalker, Leia Organa, Han Solo and Chewbacca are the face of the Rebel Alliance, both on screen and off screen. If the Rebels were your thing growing up, it’s hard to not want to go and play with these classic characters. Not to mention, Luke is arguably the best unit in the entire game and has a new version coming soon! Toss in the newer characters such as Jyn, Sabine and Pathfinders, the Rebels have a bunch of tools they can utilize. 

As you enter the game you’ll start referring things off hand and one of those things happens to be what is called a “Z6”. Basically, this is referring to the miniature with the big ol’ gatlin gun. You’ll have folks who live by the Z6, myself included, you’ll have people who hate the Z6 (hey, Codec!) and both have very fine reasons to love or hate it. The Z6 is a heavy weapon upgrade that costs 22 points for your Rebel Trooper units and rolls six white attack dice. White attack dice are quite finicky, so these rolls have what is called high variance. Some rolls you can roll straight fire, other rolls you can roll straight duds. If anything, it kind of feels thematic. As you will note, the Z6 and variation are listed in both the Pros and the Cons. You need to take the good with the bad!

The next thing I mentioned are gimmicks. What are the gimmicks and why are these a Pro versus a Con? Well let’s dive in on some very specific things. One of the best things the Rebels have to offer are Han’s Command Cards. Change of Plans is the one I want to talk about the most here. Basically, Change of Plans allows you to force your opponent to pick up their Command Card and play a different card in its stead. That is so, so strong; especially when you start learning the game and reading what your opponent might play next. It’s a complete game changer! Another gimmick is the keyword Infiltrate. This came out with Jyn and the Pathfinders quite some time ago now, and what it does is allows you to deploy on the battlefield anywhere as long as you are outside of range 3 of your opponent. It’s a very strong keyword and I think it’s still something that needs more exploring as to how to use it best. 

At the end of this piece on the Rebels, we’ll go over some tactics and how to attack certain factions and objectives. For now, let’s talk about the Cons. There may be quite a bit of them, but I promise you: Don’t let it scare you away from this awesome faction!

Cons

  • Dice variation, both offensive and defensive
  • Restricted archetypes, competitively speaking
  • Lack of Entourage
  • Lack of Suppressive and/or Range 4 weapons (right now)
  • Lack of inherent Impact weapons

Dice variation and dice in general will be the downfall of all your endeavors as a Rebel player. White defense dice, in short terms, are not that good. It’s something you learn to live with as a Rebel. Just like when you throw your four black, six white dice pools from Rebel Troopers with a Z6 and they roll like one hit into heavy cover for no damage. These are shortcomings you just need to realize can and will happen! It’s not the end of Alderaan, it’s just stuff you need to practice with and learn how to better maintain your army. Positioning, something we’ll get into below, is vital to everything.

Restricted archetypes in the competitive setting is a thing. What I mean by this is that Rebels tend to rely on certain lists at a high level. This may not pique your interest, however, in the event that it does here are some things to look for in regards to this. The most common build you will find is what’s called Wonder Twins. If you guessed Leia and Luke, you guessed correctly. Toss in a bunch of trooper spam (mostly all Z6 Rebel Trooper squads) and two to three sniper strike teams and that’s your go to Wonder Twins list. Yes, if you’re new to the game and reading this: three sniper strike teams is a pretty big deal in the competitive scene. Right now, as units release, there is a feeling this may change but we shall see. Another type of list you’ll see is Luke and Sabine together with troopers and snipers. A crowd favorite, albeit a super hard list to run in my opinion, is the Falcon Crew which consists of Han, Leia and Chewie. I’ve tried it casually a few times and it is super fun, but it is definitely a high skill cap list. Speaking of a high skill cap list: Fly Boys. While it’s not as popular as it used to be, thanks Sabine Wren, Fly Boys is a variation of Luke and Han. The reason it’s somewhat difficult to run is that both Luke and Han need to be in your opponents face and due to range limitations this causes control problems. You never want to find yourself in a situation where both pieces need to activate first in a round but that can be hard to distinguish. It’s a list that takes a lot of practice.

Two keywords the Rebels are missing from their repertoire are Entourage and Suppressive. Both are starting to be prominent in the Empire side of things but lacking on the Rebel side. This is not a complaint, whatsoever, but more of a PSA for new Rebel players as both keywords are extremely strong. If you don’t know what they do: Entourage allows you to ignore the rank of unit X when list building and when issuing orders you may issue that unit an order token if they are within range 1 to 2 of said commander. It’s a super strong keyword for a few reasons. Ignoring the rank, especially a special forces, allows you to build a list with extra items you aren’t normally allowed to and getting a free order token is extremely strong as it gives you more control over your army. Currently Emperor Palpatine has this keyword with the Imperial Royal Guard and Director Krennic has it with the Imperial Death Troopers. Next on the list is Suppressive which basically guarantees a suppression goes onto a unit you shot and if a hit or crit on your dice appears you apply two suppression to the unit that you shot. This is a really basic way of putting this, as we do not want to go into great detail of suppression, however if you would like a deeper read on the topic David Zelenka, of the Fifth Trooper Network, put out a great article a few days ago on Suppression and how it works in Star Wars Legion.

A main issue for the Rebel faction is lack of long range shooting, such as range 4 weapons. They are extremely scarce in the Rebel faction as opposed to the Imperial faction. In Legion the range bands are all in increments of six inches. So range 1 is six inches, range 2 is twelve, range 3 is eighteen and range 4 is twenty four inches. (There are exceptions, of course, with snipers, the ATST mortart and “Bombardments” that allow infinite range) Most Rebel units have a maximum range of 3 and the most utilized is the Z6 trooper, as mentioned before, which falls into that category. While the Imperials have a commonly used gun called a DLT which throws two red dice at range 4. While it’s not an overly strong gun, the DLT, it serves a purpose. First, it mostly provides suppression from range 4 and the Rebels have no answer for it, really. Second, it has Impact 1 which is important when attacking things with armor. These are two tools the Rebels don’t have as readily available as the Imperials do. That said, FFG just announced some upcoming unit upgrades that will really help take this Con away! The D20 (short term for the new, upcoming range 4 Rebel weapon) Season is almost upon us! Let’s shoot things from afar, ladies, gents, Ithorians and Duros!

Strategy

Rebel defense dice, outside of Luke and Sabine who throw red dice, are not good. I’m telling you right now, there are going to be games where you think these dice are completely blank. It’s part of being a Rebel and it’s part of the learning curve you’ll need to take when learning this faction. The most important thing for a Rebel player is position. You’re going to want to make sure that you find line of sight blocking terrain or at least heavy cover terrain whenever you can get it. Always remember, white defense dice are just as good as red when you don’t have to roll them. The last thing you ever want to find yourself doing is leaving a unit in the open, they will die. I think you need to go in a mindset that you’re going to lose a lot of games early on in your Rebel “career” and you should not let it frustrate you. There are so many nuances that go into playing this faction and the best way to learn them is practice.

Something that I find best as a Rebel player is making your opponent come to you. The more you help out your own action economy is better. The quicker your opponent gets into your range 3 band, the quicker you can aim and shoot or “shoot and scoot” (self explanatory but you shoot and move behind cover, if possible) versus moving up and shooting into something that can return fire at you. I hate saying this, but getting into a gunline battle with the Empire is never going to work in your favor. Well, maybe it will 10% of the time. You’re going to want to play hide and seek as much as you can, which is so thematic. At the end of the day, the Rebels are the guerrilla warfare faction as they should be.

One of the most important pieces of advice I can give you is to learn how to counter suppression as fast as you can with the Rebel faction. Star Wars Legion is a six round game, so when you break it down you have twelve actions with each unit you put on the board and you need to make them count. Suppression is what takes these actions away. You need to learn ways to make sure you get as many actions as you can with your army. There’s keywords like Inspire and training upgrades like Endurance that can go a LONG way in optimizing your army and their actions. I am a big advocate of running multiple sources of Inspire in my Rebel armies, but this is the beauty of the game: certain things that I do won’t really work for you. You need to make sure you build your army the way you want to and learn it the way that suits your play style best. Sure, we here at the Jedha Journal can give you advice but ultimately it’s up to you, the player, on how effective you can be at this game with the army you decide on.

We hope this little guide on the Rebel faction can help clarify some things for you when trying to pick a faction. Considering Mike and I are both primarily Rebel players, I think we may have a bias in regards to beginning with the Rebels, even if they are somewhat difficult to learn. Remember, there’s always something awesome about putting Luke Skywalker on the table! Are we biased about that opinion? Of course we are. That’s because we’re out there winning games with him rather than getting his right hand cut off on Bespin by his father. A classic Skywalker move, might we add. At the end of the day, though, make sure whatever decision you make is what you’re happy with. It’s going to be an expensive hobby for collecting one faction in a competitive setting, let alone if you decide Rebels aren’t for you and you want an identity swap. Which I think we are going to call “Red Fever.” Once you start throwing those red defense dice, you’ll never want to put them down. Speaking of red dice, the next faction we’re going to touch upon is the Imperials. (Boo! Boo this faction!)

The Galactic Empire 

Despite what Zach may have you believe, the Galactic Empire isn’t all bad. Sure, they really only have two downsides, their Villains are badass, and their units look super cool, but they are by no means the end-all-be-all of Legion. Even though I currently run Rebels in a competitive setting, I began my Legion journey with the Galactic Empire, and ended up swapping to Rebels full-time after Invader League Season 3. The Empire is a great entryway to the game, as it’s arguably the easier, more forgiving, faction to play. (Here comes the hate) Lets start with the cons. 

Cons

  • Corp power dwindles easier
  • Expensive
  • Uhhhhh…I don’t have any more

First off, the Empire’s heavy hitters are quite expensive. With well equipped Deathtroopers, Imperial Royal Guard, and the Tank all clocking in north of 100 points per unit, and Darth Vader, the Emperor, and the ATST all finishing well over 200 points, the Empire can struggle to flush out activation counts if you are not careful. Additionally, the standard DLT Stormtrooper squads comes in at 68 points, so there is not much room for luxury upgrades on either the corp squads or the main units. Taking the full six corp units and a 200 point commander severely limits your options when it comes to list building, almost forcing competitive Empire lists to include three sniper strike teams or (eventually) mortar troopers to achieve a double digit activation count. Expensive units in and of themselves are not an inherent downside, but Legion involves a considerable amount of dice luck, and when you roll cold for a turn or two, losing expensive units every time hurts the morale much more than cheap ones.

Speaking of the corp units of the Empire, specifically the backbone DLT Stormtrooper, they can lag slightly behind their rebel counterparts. As Zach described earlier, the rebel trooper unit is effective down to its last two men, because its Z6 allows it to continue to throw seven dice with only two squad members. The DLT, while much more consistent because of its red dice base, only throws two dice, meaning that the final two Stormtroopers only contribute three dice to an attack. Unfortunately, this means anything in heavy or even light cover remains relatively safe. This becomes even more of a problem when Rebel Troopers and Stormtroopers go head to head, as a single Rebel unit leader with their nimble defensive keyword and heavy cover can easily survice a number of two, or even three, man Stormtrooper unit shots.  This logic doesn’t apply to Snowtroopers, as their flamethrower upgrade is as effective as the size of the enemy target, but does come with a range 1 caveat, meaning your squad is most likely not in a safe location. 

Pros

  • Forgiving defense dice
  • Point and shoot
  • Killer operatives
  • Palpatine
  • More viable tournament options

The range 1 Snowtrooper shot also leads into the first, and most obvious, advantage of playing the Empire: red dice saves. Have you ever thought to yourself, “I’d really like to step into the open for this killer shot, but I don’t want to lose my squad.”? If so, the Empire is for you. With nearly every trooper unit, with the exception of Scout Troopers and Krennic, possessing at least a 50/50 save or better, Empire players have the opportunity to be more aggressive than their Rebel counterparts, which can lead to some advantageous situations. These situations also arrive more frequently because of the Empire’s gluttonous access to range 4 shooting. It is incredibly easy to create an 11-activation Empire list that contains ten range four weapons, leading to some easy point and shoot tactics that work at both a beginner and advanced level. In fact, both Worlds 2018 and Invader Season 3 were won by two phenomenal players maximizing this range game to its fullest extent.

One of the pros shared by both Rebels and Empire players is the access to some killer characters, especially in the Operative slot. Both Boba Fett and Bossk are extremely viable options that bring very different skills to the table, and can adapt to a number of situations they may encounter. In fact, they even function well together in the same list! Even though it may seem strange that the Emperor himself has joined the battlefields in Legion, he is definitely an attraction for playing as the Empire. Palpatine offers arguably the strongest command hand in the game, and is a monster in his own right on the table itself. In terms of one single model, he has the largest impact across the board of anything currently available; possessing the abilities to control activations and timings of both his own and his opponents units. 

The final major advantage to playing Empire is the greater number of competitive tournament options. Whereas the Rebels are chained to Luke (at the time this article was written), the Empire can roll out a number of effective lists, including Veers/Krennic with either bounty hunter, double bounty hunters, Palpatine, or even Vader and Bossk together. The most prominent example of this can be seen at Worlds 2018. Whereas the Rebels all played a version of Wonder Twins (Luke and Leia together), the Imperials showed up with Veers/Boba, Palpatine, Krennic/Boba, and Palpatine/Deathtroopers. If you’re looking to jump into the competitive seen, the Empire provides a larger roadmap to follow. 

Strategy

Seeing as I am presently short on fulltime Empire experience, the Empire has two major tactics I’d like to briefly discuss: Range 4 and Suppression. And spoiler alert, they mix like Anakin and younglings. In the game’s current state, the Empire contains a huge amount of range advantage over the Rebels, and being able to shoot the enemy before they can shoot you is a crucial advantage. When you couple this with Suppressive weapons that can stack on two suppression tokens per shot, this range advantage is amplified. By staying out of range of the enemy and stacking suppression on them to ensure they cannot move and shoot, you can effectively eliminate enemy units without suffering return fire. Ironically, the best counter to the Empire’s suppressive strategy can be Krennic, an Imperial commander. Using his compel ability, you are able to keep your ability to move and shoot in order to maintain range to the opponent. 

Final Thoughts

While our Empire experience is not as fleshed out as our Rebel portion, we hope you were able to take some points from this intro guide. If you’re looking for some more in-depth Empire knowledge, both TheFifthTrooper.com and EmpireLegion.com (the home of Team Relentless) have some deep dives on Empire units and strategies. Additionally, if you’re looking to test your newfound skills, the Canada Fan Expo and the London Grand Championship are still taking signups, so get in and get that Worlds Invite….so that you can join Zach in the tournament, and continue to watch me struggle to find my way to Chicago.

Starting next week, the CIS and GAR portions of these guides will release, with the caveat that things may change as the units start hitting everyone’s tables. Speaking of hitting “Tables”, if you’re interested to get an early look at the CIS and how they operate, LJ Pena had a Yavin Base Team League game last night streamed by Davis Kingsley. It’s…..a droid nightmare. They came in swarms, they Roger Rogered, they conquered. Here’s the link to the Twitch Vod here: TalkPolite vs DrRizzle YBTL2. Hope you enjoy the article and remember: when choosing a faction, choose what appeals to you most! At the end of the day, you’re choosing plastic toys, so make sure you enjoy your decision.

-Zach and Mike

Sportsmanship 101: Don’t be a Schmuck

General
Image result for star wars handshake
Alternate Star Wars Legion World: Han Solo shakes Wedge Antilles’ hand, presumably after Han pulled some Gunslinger shenanigans. He is truly, truly Sorry About the Mess.

Welcome back to the Jedha Journal! Now that tournament season is in full swing and Legion has officially moved into its Year 2 cycle, Zach and I thought it would be useful to put out an overview of sportsmanship in Legion and how it applies to everyone. We would like to casually discuss the topic without diving down the rabbit hole too much, but think it’s something that is worth at least brushing upon.

The easiest way to be a good sportsman in Legion, and really any game, is to know the rules and know the cards you brought with you inside and out. Simply knowing what you are playing with, and having the respect for your opponent to be knowledgeable about both your own and their own units, can prevent so many discussions, arguments, and inconsistencies before they even begin. Just think how much easier driving would be if everyone knew what to do….

I want to give a quick kudos to Jay from The Fifth Trooper for this next point, as anyone who listens to Jay’s casts knows that he is a huge proponent of this idea. Narrating your actions is the best way to preemptively halt an argument from beginning. Think back to the last time you had a disagreement with another Legion player; it probably went somewhere along the lines of “Hey, that wasn’t range 3 before!”, didn’t it? By talking through all of your movements, actions, and ranges, you are able to keep the game-state as accurate as possible, and have a more enjoyable playing experience with your opponent. This plays directly into the idea of being open about accidents. Everyone who has ever played a tabletop game has accidentally bumped a model or a piece of terrain. When this happens, it is the responsibility of the player to announce that something has been bumped and for both players to acknowledge this. By ensuring that both players understand and can fix any mistakes, arguments can be avoided and the game-state can remain legal and fun. This player discussion can also avoid the necessity of calling a judge for an issue that should never escalate.

There are two generic rules we would like to present on sportsmanship, and they’re potentially easy to understand yet the most common ones broken: don’t twist the rules, and don’t be a schmuck. Legion has quite a few rules, and even more exceptions, and it’s extremely likely that a newer or intermediate player does not have every single bullet point memorized. This is absolutely no excuse for a player to twist a rule or an interpretation for his or her own benefit. If you suspect something like this is happening, calling a judge is the very next action you should take. However, if there is a situation that arises that you are not one hundred percent confident about, there is nothing wrong with checking the Rules Reference Guide, asking your opponent for clarification, and attempting to find a compromise before calling the judge.

Knowing when to call a judge, as well as having the right mindset about it, can play a crucial role in sportsmanship. There is absolutely nothing wrong or impolite about calling a judge when a dispute or potential dispute arises, it is quite literally the only reason that person is at the event. The very first page of the new FFG Floor Rules documents reads, “It is the Judges’ duty to determine the proper resolution to any issues that may occur over the course of an event…”, pretty straightforward right? 

Next, and certainly not least, just don’t be a schmuck. Everybody reading this knows what kind of behaviors they don’t like to see across the table from them, so don’t be that person. If you think something you’re doing would cause another player to become agitated, resist the urge and act another way. Legion is still in its infancy as a community, and the negative connotation that comes with a lack of sportsmanship is a black mark we cannot afford to have. If there is one Golden Rule you take from this, it is such: Be the player who draws a new person into the game, and not the player that creates snarky internet comments. Remember: at the end of the day we’re pushing plastic toys that we assemble like the grown children that we are, from a Galaxy far, far away….that doesn’t even exist. Having fun is what Star Wars Legion is all about!

As readers of this small time blog, we’re sure you also listen to The Notorious Scoundrels. A few episodes ago they had an entire episode dedicated to this topic and brush upon it again this past week after some recent incidents. (No we will not go into details about it nor should anyone else. If you have heard about it, use it as a learning experience.) One thing the Scoundrels brought up in this past episode is how to start off on the right foot with your opponent. This doesn’t need to be a stand off-ish thing right from the get go. Speak to your opponent like how you’d like to be spoken to. Get to know them. Ask them “we’re they’re from?”, “how often they play?”, “what’s their local scene about?”, “are you on the Legion Discord?” to try and put a face to a name. Things like this can go a long way in setting the tone for the rest of your match, potentially you’re entire day.

If you’re looking to practice your sportsmanship, there are two great events coming up, the London Grand Championship and the Canadian Grand Championship. The London GT runs from September 12-14thand includes a host of prizes for top 3, a swagbag for anyone who attends, and 32 custom tables made by Ellis Priestley and Nicky Myland. The Canadian GT, now being head-manned by the ever moving main judge Brendon Franz and World Champion Luke Cook, runs from August 24-25thand spots and prizes are filling up quickly. Both tournaments include tickets on the line for Worlds and will be fantastic experiences.

We hope that this rambling article has brought a basic understanding of how to act when attending a Legion event, and once again invite you to listen to the Podcast episodes listed above. As Legion continues to grow, we hope everyone reading can continue to grow our community in a positive light, and be the ambassadors that Legion needs. Luke, Alex, and all the staff at FFG have done a phenomenal job at engaging with the community, and its up to us to take that next step. Mike looks to be a good sportsman and have a great run tomorrow at the Maryland Rallypoint Qualifier! (No pressure) Until next time, thanks for stopping by the Jedha Journal!

-Mike and Zach

Jedha Jank: Vandor Dreaming

General
“And the pierce came a’rollin”

Welcome to our initial installment of Jedha Jank! In this series, Zach and I will attempt to come up with an off the wall, yet functional list. Once we’ve developed an idea, we’ll explain what specific tactic or gimmick the list excels at, in an attempt to make a case for why you should give this list a shot for your next casual gaming night.

Vandor Dreaming
Commanders 
Jyn Erso (130) + Duck and Cover (8) + Environmental Gear (3) + A-180 Rifle Config (0) = 141
Operatives
 Sabine Wren (125) + Recon Intel (2) + Electro Grappling Line (5) + The Darksaber (25) = 157
– Chewbacca (110) + Hunter (6) = 116
Corps 
 Fleet Troopers (44) + Scatter Gun Trooper (23) + Rebel Officer (19) + Environmental Gear (3) = 89
 3x Rebel Troopers (40) = 120
Special Forces 
 2x Rebel Commandos (60) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 176

Total: 799/800 

 

 

This list involves a small, 9 activation strike force led by Jyn Erso, mainly supported by Sabine and Chewbacca. The concept as whole involves Jyn and Sabine running amuck behind and in-between the opponent’s lines while Chewie takes the main body of the force into the action. Jyn’s infiltrate combines nicely with Sabine’s natural speed 3, and the two ladies can quickly begin throwing bombs and small piercing shots to draw out opponents and put pressure on normally safe objectives. Oh, and there’s six units with pierce, and four of those shoot at range three.

Chewie takes the important task for the list. As anyone who has faced a competent Chewbacca knows, killing minis in his guardian bubble, especially when they’re in cover, can be a difficult task; as you tend to become crit reliant. Killing minis is important in Legion, even more so when those minis come equipped with pierce, sharpshooter, or giant dice pools. Full commando squads and fleet troopers bring all of that to the table. 

Hopefully the concept is quickly becoming clear. Chewie, Officer Fleets, and two Hunter Commando squads with snipers bring a tremendous amount of stopping power, and not much can stop that freight train once it starts (literally) rolling. By distracting the opponent and putting pressure on areas they consider to be safe with Jyn and Sabine, you can casually push your death ball up the board until its too close for your opponent to handle. The three naked rebel troopers function as objective grabbers and filler. They basically replace the triple snipers in most meta lists, so the order pool stays functionally the same. 

The best competitive features of this list arrive in its access to pierce and relatively easy order control. Placing orders on Jyn and Sabine goes a long way to giving you great timing. Because each of your heavy hitters has pierce and either sharpshooter or a double digit dice pool, going to the bag generally means that you will be able to draw enough firepower to do some heavy, piercing damage to an enemy unit. Additionally, having four corp tokens but only one true corp attack allows you to keep the fleets flexible with their activation timing, which is crucial considering their range two attack band.

In the build up to the Northeast Open, I ran this list about five times to get an idea of how it works. I was originally taking this in an attempt to win the Golden T-47 for the jankiest list, but decided to take a competitive list instead. I encourage you to try something in this vein for your next beer and pretzels event or casual local tournament; there is also a fun variant where Han, some upgrades, and a medic replace Sabine. One of the best parts of Legion is building a fun, thematic list that specializes in a dastardly tactic, and we will try to highlight some of these over the coming months. Feel free to comment with some of your favorite Jyn Jank lists, and share the ideas with your friends!

-Mike

Descending Activation League

General

Han T47Here at our local store there seems to be a common denominator: everyone is sick of sniper strike teams. As you’re transitioning from a beginner to the competitive scene, perhaps, you’ll start noticing something in every list: three snipers. I can attest to the fact that having three snipers in a competitive setting is probably mandatory. At first, I didn’t think so, but the more I play the more I realize it’s a necessary evil. Personally, I’m not sick of the sniper war because it means I’m practicing what I call my competitive list. Practicing a list and muscle memory is so key to success if you want to take the next steps as a player in this game. However, keeping things fresh is also a good thing. When you’re helping build a growing Legion community like me and my friends are, you want everyone to be having fun. You don’t want people showing up to play and saying “three snipers, again?”. So on the heels of Imperial Discipline’s 500 point system, which you should check out, and ironically the Legion Outriders this week had a big discussion of ways to keep things fresh in your local area as well, I put together a four week league for our local store.

 

Format

“Regular list building rules apply, 800 point armies. Standard battle card decks. Four week league with ten days (not strict, but try our best) to set up a game with your opponent starting on x date. Challonge bracket will determine who has the bye per week, report your scores to me to enter into the league page to keep track of the standings. Swiss set up should allow us to get one undefeated person at the end but if we want to do a top two cut final week of the same format of week four, I’m open to the idea! No limitation to faction.”

  • Week 1
    • Must build a list with no more than nine activations
    • Maximum two sniper strike teams per army list
  • Week 2
    • Must build a list with no more than eight activations
    • Maximum one sniper strike team per army list
  • Week 3
    • Must build a list with no more than seven activations
    • Maximum one sniper strike team per army list
  • Week 4
    • Must build a list with no more than seven activations
    • No sniper strike teams allowed per army list

As you can see each week we start limiting activation counts and the number of sniper strike teams you are allowed to bring. I felt like six activations was too few and decided to stop at the seven mark and zero snipers on the final week. We ended up having nine participants for our local store, which is extremely exciting, and we have two brand new players. I’d like to think this is a good set up for the newer players to come into playing the game at a different level than they have been. They won’t need to create or bring what are considered super competitive lists. Heck, they might not even have enough stuff for 9+ activations at the moment anyways. I can’t wait to break them into a bigger world of Star Wars Legion with this league and I hope they enjoy it! The more players we get going towards Clone Wars the better!

I highly recommend that if you use this format to set it up on Challonge, a website for league and tournament structure, and there is a new community page where you don’t even need the participants to create an account to set anything up. Just get someone to run the league and run the Challonge site and it will generate week to week games and standings for you. It’s a great tool!

 

Final Notes

There will be people who will want to just play the top, competitive lists at all times and I get that. I’m almost that type of person myself, only because I want to continue to get better at this game with my top tier list. However, I do believe that list building can get very boring at the top level and this is a shake up most people can use. It’s nothing fancy and you can make it longer if you wanted and tinker around with the restrictions that you apply. At the end of the day, this game is about having fun and this is something everyone at the local store is excited about, so am I. I’m going to be working on setting up a sort of narrative campaign for after this format, once I get that done I’ll post that for everyone too! I’m going to put a lot of work into that one, though, so it may take some time!

 

May the Force be with You!

New Hampshire Rally Point Qualifier

General

Jungle table

Last Saturday up in Derry, NH we had our Rally Point Qualifier. This is my home store, I live no more than five minutes away. We were so excited to host this event as we have a smaller group than most, I think, but we are growing! We are actually about to start a four week league and we have nine participants, which is nice. We ended up with thirteen for the RPQ which fell right in to what I kind of expected. I had been saying anywhere from twelve to sixteen made sense for us, having an odd number was less than ideal but it is what it is! We had a few guys come up from Massachusetts, some of which I play with when I can get down to their store. One guy came up from Connecticut and the real cool thing was the two guys that drove the five plus hours from Montreal!

As for me, I went 1 and 2 on the day. I won my first match and I was feeling pretty good! My second match I lost one of the closest games I have played, it went to points, and it’s still a tough pill to swallow. Long story short: If you think it’s time to play Change of Plans don’t doubt yourself. Just play the card! Rather than go through a battle report of my games, which I could do even without visuals because I was a slacker who took zero pictures of the event due to just being zone in completely on playing, I don’t want to ramble on about those. What I would rather do is put up everyone’s list from the day because we had a great mix of lists. As a Rebel player I kind of expected to see more Imperial than Rebels by a decent margin, but I was pleasantly wrong. The Rebellion lives on! With thirteen players we went with three rounds of swiss with a top two cut to ensure that strength of schedule didn’t win the tournament. Ironically, we would have only had one person go 3 and 0, though.

I’m going to type up every player’s list from their final position in the standings. We’ll start with Doug, some of you know him as Sploosh on the Discord. He won the tournament, going 3-0 in the swiss rounds, and then capping it off with the final cut victory.

First Place: Doug

Commanders:
– Director Orson Krennic (90) = 90
Operatives:
– Boba Fett (140) + Recon Intel (2) = 142
Corps:
– Stormtroopers (44) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 63
– Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) = 68
– 2x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 174
Special Forces:
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + Comms Relay (5) + Recon Intel (2) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 125
– 3x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 132
Total: 794/800
Commands:
– Whipcord Launcher (1)
– Voracious Ambition (1)
– ZX Flame Projector (2)
– Deploy the Garrison (2)
– Z-6 Jetpack Rocket (3)
– Annihilation Looms (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Breakthrough
– Key Positions
– Recover Supplies
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Clear Condition
– Hostile Environment
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements
From what I understand from Doug’s list, as I did not play against him, is to Entourage to the Deathtroopers who then Comms Relay to a medbot unit with charges left in order to ensure he can bring back a sniper or a Deathtrooper if they were to take a wound early in the round. It’s a list built for efficiency by an efficient player and it’s no surprise that he won the tournament. Congratulations to Doug aka Sploosh on his fantastic tournament and well deserved win!
Second Place: Charles 
Charles is one of the players that drove down from Montreal and he had himself a day with quite an interesting list! I’m glad he got to come down and have a great RPQ experience, especially with that drive!
Commanders:
– Luke Skywalker (160) + Force Push (10) + Emergency Stims (8) = 178
– Leia Organa (90) + Improvised Orders (10) = 100
Operatives:
– Chewbacca (110) + Tenacity (4) + Emergency Stims (8) = 122
Corps:
– Fleet Troopers (44) + Scatter Gun Trooper (23) + Impact Grenades (5) = 72
– 2x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) = 124
Special Forces:
– Wookiee Warriors (75) + Bowcaster Wookiee (35) + Tenacity (4) = 114
– 2x Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 88
Total: 798/800
Commands:
– Son of Skywalker (1)
– Coordinated Bombardment (1)
– Brains and Brawn (2)
– No Time for Sorrows (2)
– Somebody Has to Save Our Skins (3)
– Return of the Jedi (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
– Recover Supplies
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– Major Offensive
– The Long March
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Limited Visibility
– Hostile Environment
– Rapid Reinforcements
If you’re part of the competitive scene you know that this list is a bit off meta but clearly it worked for Charles! Congrats to him on his second place finish and good luck to him at his RPQ’s up in Canada!
Third Place: Carl
Carl also came down from Montreal and I had the pleasure of playing against him in my second game, the infamous why did I not play Change of Plans game for me. I’m still haunted! That said, Carl was a great opponent and our game was awesome. As the lone Palpatine player in the field, it was nice to play against him. I don’t have the details of his list for some reason but off memory this is what I recall!
Commanders:
– Emperor Palpatine (210) + Anger (5) + Force Choke (5) = 220
Corps:
– Snowtroopers (48) + Flametrooper (20) + Imperial Officer (20) + Recon Intel (2) + Fragmentation Grenades (5) = 95
– Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + Recon Intel (2) = 70
– 2x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 174
Special Forces:
– 3x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 132
– Imperial Royal Guards (75) + Electrostaff Guard (25) + Tenacity (4) + Recon Intel (2) = 106
Total: 797/800

I wish I had more data to dump in here as I like to see what everyone’s battle card choices are just for curiosity, but we’re going to have to use our imagination for this one! I’m glad the two guys who traveled the farthest made it into the top three, I’m sure it made their trip a lot more worth it!

 

Fourth Place: Andrew

Speaking of off meta lists: you’re about to be in for a treat. Andrew is one of our local players and he likes to play off the meta, that’s a fact. He got a bye round one and ended up playing Doug in a battle of the 2-0’s in round three for a chance to make the final. He fell a little short, but I’m sure he’s content with the two games he played and making fourth place!

Commanders:
– Leia Organa (90) + Commanding Presence (10) + Improvised Orders (10) = 110
Corps:
– 4x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Recon Intel (2) = 256
– Rebel Troopers (40) + R5 Astromech Droid (8) + Recon Intel (2) = 50
– Fleet Troopers (44) + Scatter Gun Trooper (23) + Rebel Officer (19) + Environmental Gear (3) = 89
Support:
– 2x AT-RT (55) + AT-RT Flamethrower (25) = 160
Heavy:
– Landspeeder (75) + Outer Rim Speeder Jockey (10) + RPS-6 Rocket Gunner (36) + A-300 Rifle Gunner (9) = 130
Total: 795/800
Commands:
– Coordinated Bombardment (1)
– Ambush (1)
– No Time for Sorrows (2)
– Turning the Tide (2)
– Assault (3)
– Covering Fire (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
– Recover Supplies
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Hostile Environment
– Limited Visibility
– Rapid Reinforcements

Vehicles, vehicles and more vehicles. No snipers. It’s quite the interesting list and I would think a lot of lists don’t really have much of an answer for it, really. No Breakthrough is quite interesting, at least to me, but I can understand it’s exclusion.

 

Fifth Place- Richard B

Richard, UrzaMagus on the Discord, came up from the store in Massachusetts that I mentioned earlier and he’s a very good player with a very efficient list. Unfortunately for him he ran into the Andrew vehicle gauntlet round two, which his list had no answer for really. Richard took me down in round three and I will be seeking vengeance upon him the next time we play! Vengeance aside, let’s look at his list.

Commanders:
– General Veers (80) + Strict Orders (5) = 85
– Director Orson Krennic (90) + Esteemed Leader (5) = 95
Corps:
– 3x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) = 204
– 2x Stormtroopers (44) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 126
Special Forces:
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + Hunter (6) + Comms Relay (5) + Emergency Stims (8) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 137
– 3x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) + Hunter (6) = 150
Total: 797/800
Commands:
– Maximum Firepower (1)
– Voracious Ambition (1)
– Push (2)
– Deploy the Garrison (2)
– Imperial Discipline (3)
– Annihilation Looms (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
– Breakthrough
– Recover Supplies
Deployments:
– Disarray
– Major Offensive
– Battle Lines
– Advanced Positions
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Hostile Environment
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements
He has what you can consider your typical middle management gun line list and he knows how to run it well. Running into Rebel vehicles is probably the only thing he didn’t want to see!
Sixth Place: Eric D
Eric is a “local” player if you want to call him that, because he plays at our store when he can. However, the man lives a good 90 minutes or so from the store so he really is a dedicated person. This was my first time meeting him and while I didn’t get to play against him, it’s clear he knows his way around FFG games!
Commanders:
– General Veers (80) + Improvised Orders (10) = 90
– Imperial Commander (50) + Strict Orders (5) = 55
Operatives:
– Boba Fett (140) + Hunter (6) + Emergency Stims (8) = 154
Corps:
– 3x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) = 204
– Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 87
Special Forces:
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 118
– 2x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 88
Total: 796/800
Commands:
– Maximum Firepower (1)
– Whipcord Launcher (1)
– Push (2)
– ZX Flame Projector (2)
– Z-6 Jetpack Rocket (3)
– Coordinated Fire (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
– Recover Supplies
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
Deployments:
– Major Offensive
– Battle Lines
– Advanced Positions
– Disarray
Conditions:
– Rapid Reinforcements
– Clear Conditions
– Hostile Environment
– Minefield

A different take on Veers/Boba here with the generic officer and some Deathtroopers sprinkled in. It seems like a very efficient list and going 2 and 1 on the day seems to back that statement up!

 

Seventh Place: Eric K

My local Rebel cohort, Eric decided to dust off Luke for this tournament after not playing him for a while. He lost game one by the skin of his teeth, had a round two bye, and capped off the day with a round three victory. We talked about his round one loss and he actually could have won after I thought of something he could have done. It was a gut punch, but it is what it is!

Commanders:
– Luke Skywalker (160) + Battle Meditation (10) + Force Push (10) + Emergency Stims (8) = 188
– Han Solo (120) + Duck and Cover (8) = 128
Corps:
– Rebel Troopers (40) + Rebel Officer (19) = 59
– Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + 2-1B Medical Droid (18) = 80
– 2x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) = 124
– Rebel Troopers (40) + Recon Intel (2) = 42
Special Forces:
– Rebel Pathfinders (68) + Duck and Cover (8) + HQ Uplink (10) = 86
– 2x Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 88
Total: 795/800 

Commands:
– Son of Skywalker (1)
– Sorry About the Mess (1)
– My Ally is the Force (2)
– Reckless Diversion (2)
– Change of Plans (3)
– Return of the Jedi (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Key Positions
– Recover Supplies
– Intercept Transmissions
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Disarray
Conditions:
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements
– Clear Conditions
– Limited Visibility

Eric opted for a set of Pathfinders here as harassers and he handles them well. I’m sure it hurts to know if he did one minor thing in game one he could have went onward but at least he knows for next time!

 

Eighth Place: Zach aka me

I’m on the Fly Boy train, as we know, and there’s no end in sight right now. Even with Sabine coming out, it will be hard pressed to take me off this list for the next RPQ in Connecticut next month. I was playing Wonder Twins for a long time but I wish it was Fly Boys all along!

Commanders:
– Luke Skywalker (160) + Force Push (10) + Jedi Mind Trick (5) + Emergency Stims (8) = 183
– Han Solo (120) + Emergency Stims (8) = 128
Corps:
– 3x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Recon Intel (2) = 192
– 2x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Rebel Officer (19) = 162
Special Forces:
– 3x Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 132
Total: 797/800
Commands:
– Son of Skywalker (1)
– Sorry About the Mess (1)
– Reckless Diversion (2)
– My Ally is the Force (2)
– Return of the Jedi (3)
– Change of Plans (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Intercept Transmissions
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
– Recover Supplies
– Breakthrough
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– Disarray
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Limited Visibility
– Rapid Reinforcements
– Minefield

It’s a tough pill to swallow for me because I know if I had played Change of Plans in the Palpatine game, I probably win and go to 2 and 0. That said, it is what it is and I can build off the day! I feel confident with how I played all day and looking forward to the next one!

 

Ninth Place: Chase

Chase was the lone gunslinger from Connecticut and while I’m sure he hoped for a better outcome I’d like to think he enjoyed his tournament! We look forward to seeing him again next month in Connecticut, here’ his list:

Commanders:
– General Veers (80) = 80
– Director Orson Krennic (90) + Strict Orders (5) = 95
Corps:
– Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + FX-9 Medical Droid (19) = 87
– 2x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) = 136
– Snowtroopers (48) + Flametrooper (20) + Fragmentation Grenades (5) = 73
Special Forces:
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + Comms Relay (5) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 123
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 118
– 2x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 88
Total: 800/800
Commands:
– Maximum Firepower (1)
– Voracious Ambition (1)
– Deploy the Garrison (2)
– Push (2)
– Annihilation Looms (3)
– Imperial Discipline (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Breakthrough
– Key Positions
– Recover Supplies
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Hostile Environment
– Clear Conditions
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements
A different take of middle management as he decided to go with two Deathtroopers as opposed to one. Which seems to be a solid debate in the competitive world of Legion! Is one or two better? Time will tell.
Tenth Place: Jeff
Speaking of different takes, our local dual faction man Jeff decided to be an Imperial fascist and he brought the heat with not just two Deathtroopers but THREE! Now I know he wished his day went better, as he had practiced this list for a good while, and he got his first win of the day against Eric K in the nailbiter of the day it seems, but the rest of the day wasn’t as kind to him. I mean, for crying out loud, the kid even ripped his shorts! Let’s have a look!
Commanders:
– Director Orson Krennic (90) + Strict Orders (5) = 95
Corps:
– 4x Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) = 272
– Snowtroopers (48) + Recon Intel (2) + Fragmentation Grenades (5) = 55
Special Forces:
– 2x Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + Overwatch (4) + Recon Intel (2) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 248
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 84
– Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 44
Total: 798/800
Commands:
– Ambush (1)
– Voracious Ambition (1)
– Push (2)
– Deploy the Garrison (2)
– Coordinated Fire (3)
– Annihilation Looms (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Breakthrough
– Key Positions
– Recover Supplies
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Hostile Environment
– Clear Conditions
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements
Eleventh Place: Phil
Phil is a local guy and he loves his vehicles. I’m surprised he didn’t bring good ol’ Stompy, his AT-ST! However, he did rock the only tank in the RPQ. As you can see, our local scene is not a very on the meta type of scene and it’s a good thing, in my opinion! Here’s Phil’s list!
Commanders:
– Director Orson Krennic (90) + Commanding Presence (10) = 100
Corps:
– Stormtroopers (44) + R4 Astromech Droid (9) + Concussion Grenades (5) = 58
– Stormtroopers (44) + DLT-19 Stormtrooper (24) + Concussion Grenades (5) = 73
– Snowtroopers (48) + Flametrooper (20) + Fragmentation Grenades (5) = 73
Special Forces:
– 2x Scout Troopers Strike Team (16) + DLT-19x Sniper (28) = 88
– Imperial Royal Guards (75) + Electrostaff Guard (25) + Tenacity (4) = 104
– Imperial Death Troopers (76) + DLT-19D (34) + Overwatch (4) + E-11D Grenade Launcher Config (8) = 122
Heavy:
– Assault Tank (155) + Imperial Hammers Elite Armor Pilot (10) + RT-97C Rifle Pintle (14) = 179
Total: 797/800
Commands:
– Voracious Ambition (1)
– Covert Observation (1)
– Deploy the Garrison (2)
– Push (2)
– Annihilation Looms (3)
– Coordinated Fire (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Recover Supplies
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
– Breakthrough
Deployments:
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
– Battle Lines
– Advanced Positions
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Hostile Environment
– Minefield
– Rapid Reinforcements

A tank, Deathtroopers AND Imperial Royal Guard. Talk about list variety!

 

Twelfth Place: Richard O
My good buddy Richard, aka Codec on the Discord, wishes he had a better day but a third Fly Boy list! It’s contagious! I know he’s going down to the Connecticut RPQ next month and will be looking for a better outcome this time around! Will he keep the Wookies? Will he bring Sabine? What will he do! Here’s his current list:
Commanders:
– Luke Skywalker (160) + Force Push (10) + Emergency Stims (8) = 178
– Han Solo (120) + Improvised Orders (10) = 130
Corps:
– 4x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) = 248
– Rebel Troopers (40) = 40
Special Forces:
– Wookiee Warriors (75) + Bowcaster Wookiee (35) + Tenacity (4) = 114
– 2x Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 88
Total: 798/800
Commands:
– Son of Skywalker (1)
– Sorry About the Mess (1)
– My Ally is the Force (2)
– Reckless Diversion (2)
– Return of the Jedi (3)
– Change of Plans (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Breakthrough
– Intercept Transmissions
– Recover Supplies
– Sabotage Moisture Vaporators
Deployments:
– Major Offensive
– Battle Lines
– Advanced Positions
– Disarray
Conditions:
– Limited Visibility
– Minefield
– Clear Conditions
– Rapid Reinforcements
Thirteenth Place: Alex
I had the pleasure of playing Alex round one and unfortunately for him I drew a somewhat favorable match up with Advanced Positions and Recover the Supplies. I got on that middle box early and turtled up. That said! His Landspeeder did some work and this thing truly is viable! Alex drove a good hour or so to get to the RPQ and unfortunately got a bye in one of the rounds, but I hope he enjoyed himself one way or another! Let’s have a look!
Commanders:
– Luke Skywalker (160) + Force Push (10) + Battle Meditation (10) + Emergency Stims (8) = 188
– Leia Organa (90) = 90
Corps:
– Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Rebel Trooper (10) + Fragmentation Grenades (5) = 77
– 3x Rebel Troopers (40) + Rebel Trooper (10) = 150
– Rebel Troopers (40) = 40
– Fleet Troopers (44) + Scatter Gun Trooper (23) + Fleet Trooper (11) = 78
Special Forces:
– Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) = 44
Heavy:
– Landspeeder (75) + Outer Rim Speeder Jockey (10) + RPS-6 Rocket Gunner (36) + A-300 Rifle Gunner (9) = 130
Total: 797/800
Commands:
– Son of Skywalker (1)
– Coordinated Bombardment (1)
– My Ally is the Force (2)
– Push (2)
– Return of the Jedi (3)
– Assault (3)
– Standing Orders (4)
Objectives:
– Breakthrough
– Key Positions
– Intercept Transmissions
– Recover Supplies
Deployments:
– Advanced Positions
– Battle Lines
– The Long March
– Major Offensive
Conditions:
– Clear Conditions
– Limited Visibility
– Hostile Environment
– Rapid Reinforcements

Wonder Twins with a Landspeeder?! It’s a lot of points, but it has loads of potential. If he keeps playing this list, he could be a menace next month if he goes down to Connecticut!

 

Final Notes

Seven Imperial players and six Rebel players? That’s a great turnout for the event in terms of faction counts and it makes me happy. I decided to do this format to give everyone some insight on what current lists look like at the early RPQ’s versus a standard Battle Report going over my games. Thought it could be a useful tool just gather an idea of what you might see if you have one in the upcoming weeks. Of course that will change when Bossk and Sabine drop, hopefully, later this month!

Thanks to our Tournament Official, Justin, who bit the bullet for all of us at the store and allowed us to play while he sat this one out. I know he’s ready to get down to Connecticut next month and get some plastic on the table. Thanks to all of the people that came from all over, it was great play against different people from different places! Again, congrats to Doug (Sploosh) on his victory and his seat to next years World’s! He can sit back and relax the rest of the way now that it’s set in stone for him. As for the rest of us? On to the next one! Good luck to everyone at their RPQ’s!

 

May the Force be with You!

Budget Tournament Tray

General

This Saturday is my first ever Legion tournament and it comes in the form of a Rallypoint Qualifier. It just so happens to be my local store, which is great! However, moving tables has never really needed to be a thing before for me, or for any of us, and I just think taking all of my miniatures and putting them back into my foam is going to be a slow process all day. “How can I fix this?”, I asked myself. I’ve seen 3D printable trays, but those would take too long to print. I’ve seen amazing trays people make and sell online, but they can be pretty pricey or at least something I don’t seem necessary for me to purchase at the very least. (This is not a knock on them, their price point or anything! There are some amazing trays and ideas out there!) I decided I needed to magnetize everything but then what do I do from there? Well the answer might sound crazy but it came in the form of a cookie tray/baking sheet. Now let’s go over what to buy, where to buy it, and what to do!

 

Magnets

My first question to someone about this idea was “What size magnets do people use to magnetize your miniatures?”. I got a reply of 5mm round x 2mm thick and then went to the one place that is easy to find things in bulk and with a search bar: Amazon. As you can see in the picture above you get 150(!) for $8.49. That’s plenty to support your army and then some! Here’s the link to them here: Tournament Tray Magnets

Your next step is pretty simple. All you need to do is put a little dabble of super glue on the bottom of your base, right in the middle, drop the magnet down and let it dry. It sounds like a tedious task, and maybe to some it is, but it’s not nearly as bad as you’d think it would be. I want to say it took me all but ten minutes to magnetize all of my stuff and more. Which we’ll get into after.

 

Cookie Tray 

I don’t think I need to go on much here, but just make sure your cookie tray will work with magnets. I happened to go to Home Goods and got this one, shown below, for $4.99. So if you’re keeping track at home: I invested a total of $13.48

 

Outcome

I’m still working on having a fully painted army. My paint time can be limited with the little hurricane known as my son is running around the house. That said, shown below are the pictures of what less than $14 can get you in terms of a tournament tray. I had some other, small magnets laying around and decided to magnetize my rang rulers with those, but I’m sure you can use the bigger ones if you want just fine. I just wanted them to be subtle on something that I constantly use. Everything fits in there comfortably and then I also have a dice box to carry around my tokens and dice. Is it the most aesthetically pleasing thing? Absolutely not, it’s a cookie tray. Either way this should help me move from table to table pretty easily come this Saturday at the RPQ, any other RPQ’s I play at this season and eventually LVO this upcoming January!

 

 

 

 

Final Notes

I’m going to have some upcoming hobby posts in the future as I continue to keep things nice and fresh here at the Jedha Journal. One of those will be a guest post about making some terrain! Which I can’t wait to read and post it, seeing as I am a lazy 3D printer as opposed to making my own terrain! Hope you enjoy this hobby snippet and go make some fourteen-ish dollar tournament trays and make your life easy changing tables! Every second counts on that clock! Good luck to all of my friends/opponents this weekend at our RPQ and any other RPQ’s going on this weekend!

May the Force be with you!

-GrandAdmiralThrawn

Guest Post: Outer Rim Rebellion-Playing Off Meta

General

Image result for leia han chewie

 

My Experience with the Falcon Crew in Competitive Play

 

Star Wars Legion is a game of dice, chance, and calculations. We can influence the math by utilizing a plethora of different factors. You’ll see a lot of information being published by some really smart people on various websites and forums, and a lot of that will focus around player skill, generally accepted best practices, and various small detail strategies – all of this is designed to help you jump start your career as a Legion player, but today I want to talk about my experience pushing things off of the popular meta. Let’s focus on the Falcon Crew.

I’ve been spending a fair chunk of my Legion playing time by fielding some of my most beloved characters from the Star Wars Universe: Han, Leia, and Chewbacca. Together they form a trinity of dodge multiplication and piercing perfection, hunting for aim efficiencies, and using their powerful command cards and teamwork to amplify rebel synergy to new heights. This list archetype is considered off meta for, at least in my opinion, two primary reasons: it doesn’t include Luke, and it includes Chewie. Luke is definitely a powerful piece, there’s no argument there. Force push is perhaps the single most influential and powerful upgrade available in Legion right now. Articles have been written about it, lists have been dedicated to it, and World’s invites have been won from using it. It’s really great, basically. I’m not using it. And then there’s Chewie. Honestly, I feel it’s difficult to argue a case for using Chewie outside of this list. He’s over costed for what he brings, particularly with Bossk coming out soon, and his command cards don’t offer a lot due to their interactive nature with the other primary rebel commanders. However, when we combine him with two out of three of those commanders, suddenly the force is with us and his cost almost feels too cheap.

 

The Cast

First billed: the Falcon Crew

Han Solo: By far and large Han’s biggest asset is his command card set. Each of them is uniquely powerful and can often ruin your opponents plans. For me, Han is one of the most difficult Legion commanders to play. You need to really read your opponent and the table well in order to maximize the effects of his command cards, and even Han himself. I won’t say I don’t feel a tiny bit of enjoyment in seeing the frustration on my opponent’s face after a well played Change of Plans, or when I know they needed a unit to go first and I Apologize for the Mess while I shatter their meticulously thought out maneuver. This is a skill this article can’t teach you, you need to play a lot of Legion, read the table, and quite frankly – screw it up a bunch of times until it starts to make sense. His second asset is that big beautiful pistol of his. Pierce 2! What more could you ask for. Oh! It shoots at two different targets, you say? With Sharpshooter 1? This is obviously old news, but using this to maximum effect is critical in this list. All of the heroes need to contribute offensively and at the right time, and Han is the centerpiece to cutting through your opponents red defense dice and corps units. For this reason I love putting upgrades like Environmental Gear on Han so he can be in the right place at the right time.

 

Leia Organa: Fearless and inventive might have been a bit of a stretch, but not by much. Leia is a big part of the synergy and defensive balance of this list, but she packs an unbelievable punch and is underutilized by a fair margin, in my opinion. When I see people playing Leia behind walls, they’re missing out on her best tools: Sharpshooter 2 and Pierce 1. And three beautiful black attack dice, too. Leia brings more than dodges to this list, and it should be shouted from the highest trees of Endor. Take Cover 2 enables Han and Chewie to push forward and engage in an aggressive way, but she shouldn’t be far behind, and we’ll touch on why later. Leia contributes by helping everyone survive, inspiring suppression, and punishing reduced units in heavy cover.

 

The Mighty Chewbacca: At 6’7”, I certainly have an affinity and appreciation for other tall creatures. Chewie is no exception. Unlike Han, Chewie’s biggest asset are his keywords. Guardian 3 and Unhindered are my favourite parts, for the purposes of this list in general, but Expert Climber and Enrage have their benefits as well. I also love his command card set – each of them is incredibly powerful and provides some huge synergy bonuses to himself and his friends. Chewie has a different type of role in this list depending on what your opponent has brought to the table, as I usually use him as a character hunter, but he also soaks wounds for your critical units in critical situations. This can be immensely frustrating for your opponent as well.

 

Stunt Doubles

Every list needs to be filled out with corps, special forces, and support units. As I have been playing this variant across multiple releases, my list structure has changed. I used to use a unit of full commandos, for instance, but have since pulled back from that in the interest of bringing more Specialists into my lists. Let’s dive into units I like to use, and why.

Corps: Z6’s. Typically I was running only three, yes I said it, three corps units. If you’ve ever read anything written by anyone intelligent in the Legion community, this is strongly frowned upon. It hasn’t stopped me from going 3-1 in the YBTL and nearly undefeated in my local area. GengisJon came up and stomped me to the curb at the last RPQ in Vancouver. Thanks Jon. Otherwise I’ve had ridiculous success with only three corps. There’s a few reasons why, though, and the primary one for me is token mix. Having a lower corps count enables me to have a higher chance of pulling a commander or special forces token, and historically I’ve found it beneficial to have what I consider a nearly even pool of 3 token types: Corps, Special Forces, and Falcon Crew (Two Commander tokens and one Operative.) Lately I’ve been switching between 3 and 4 corps, as I occasionally take an FD turret, but more on that later. In this list Improvised Orders is incredibly necessary.

Special Forces: I love Hunter Snipers. And I mean it when I say I love them. Falcon Crew thrives on taking out characters and mopping up the remainder. Murdering Vader at the beginning of turn 3 feels good, let me tell you. I will often run three Hunter Sniper Strike teams, which is considered wildly off meta because of the 18 points of Hunter, just so we’re still on theme here, or two Sniper Strike teams and a single Sniper Commando squad with Hunter. Sniper Commandos are widely considered too fragile, as well, but you have Chewie to help these guys along. Full Commando squads are incredibly fragile, which makes running them very high risk. If you’re going to do it, you need to practice your timing and doing things like popping out or making sure you have higher priority targets available for your opponent, because they can focus fire your Commandos down before you know it. Five black and one white dice with Sharpshooter 1 is no joke, however, so these can pack a serious punch and ruin targets in any type of cover. Use them wisely.

Support: 1.4 FD Laser Cannon Team. It’s a mouthful. I get it. The FD cannon is actually really good, at least in my opinion. Range four and impact two are both things the rebels struggle with, and a naked FD provides all manner of area control and denial if used correctly. I usually run this piece as area control and denial and less so for impact, although having it is very handy if you do run up against some AT-RTs, for instance. It should be common sense that you want this to be behind a barricade or cover of some form, as it will strongly enhance it’s longevity. There’s also an argument to be made for a naked RT as well. Three red dice for using your toes isn’t too bad, but the mobile cover and recent rules changes that allow you to be in base contact with it to negate the cover are great for pieces like Han. Just don’t roam it too far up.

Specialists: Bring those Officers. Two of them, in fact. There’s also evidence that med droids could be beneficial but this list doesn’t seem to want it as badly as it wants Officers. It wants actions, really. Between Leia and the two officers you will have no problems with suppression, typically. You can also leave a suppression on an Officer z6 for that free mobile cover, or heavy if there is enough light cover on the board. To date I have found that most folks are strongly undervaluing Courage two, and the loss of actions from suppression. Death Troopers have the Rebel lists of the world shaking in fear, so ideally you don’t leave home without Officer squads any longer. I have yet to find a good purpose for the Comms Specialist in a Rebel list, unfortunately, and this list is no exception to that.

 

General Deployment and Tactics

For the most part you want to keep the Falcon Crew together. And the rest of the list, really. Han and Chewie should never really be beyond range two, ever. Just don’t do it. Leia should typically be within range one of Chewie at all times. This configuration allows her to dish out some dodges to both herself and to Han and Chewie via teamwork, or if she’s within range one of both, they can have two dodges each and play more aggressively that turn. You can look to set this up on the turn after Sorry About the Mess, for instance, as Han may be in a vulnerable spot. You want your Officer z6’s nearby Han as well, to control any suppression he may be stacking, be it from Reckless Diversion or otherwise, as well as controlling any on Leia as her having two actions is very important.

Your special forces get a bit more free roaming power, but they should be setting themselves up for shots against characters or multiwound units, at least by turn two. The idea here is we want to maximize Hunter, as the z6’s and the Falcon Crew will start making swift work of any corps coming your way. Typically I look for a Leia bombard shot on characters early, first turn if possible. It’s predictable but we’re looking for results, not surprises, with this move. If we can see any snipers with this, it’s great, but finding ways to terrain scope any valuable units is also good. This should become automatic for you as you play over time, but it’s a good opportunity to bring it up now, so next time you’re playing Leia and planning this, just look for these opportunities. As you’re looking for these things we’re also going to look for opportunities to hide our snipers from other snipers, and give them line of sight to enemy commanders or multiwound units to start getting those Hunter aims. It’s scary being able to roll into two crits occasionally, or two hits in the open, for example.

Your third corps in this list can set up shop wherever he or she pleases, just make sure it’s within command range and the plan is to move them in a way that will keep them there, nearby the Falcon Crew. These can act as objective grabbers, skirmishers, or anything you see fit.

Typically we’d be looking to push the Crew up into combat somewhat early, so they can deal some mean damage to your opponent, with the exception of when someone wielding a lightsaber is coming at you. It’s advisable to stay out of range until they’re far more whittled down. Getting Han into areas to maximize his gunslinger should be very high on your list, basically. Having Chewie shoot at multiwound models or characters is hugely important, one, because he’s a hairy crit monster, and two, because it feeds Han aims. Han doesn’t need aims, but the laws of the random number generators tell us that reds still roll blanks from time to time, so it’s nice to have. Leia can comfortably be giving out dodges and moving up, or shooting and moving, and so forth. If someone is targeting her it just means your other high value pieces are being less harassed and have more freedom to punish your opponent.

 

Command Card usage and Timing

I can’t write about how to use Change of Plans, you have to understand your opponent’s list and what timing works best on the table in that moment. But we can start to talk about Brains and Brawn. This card can and should wipe a whole unit off the table under the right environmental conditions, minus those with impervious or pierce immunity, or more than six wounds. Don’t rely on rolling more than five hits, typically, though. An aim here is incredibly valuable for this reason. We want to use this when Leia is within range of two different units she can target, preferably without moving, but sometimes the sneak attack is worth it. Keep in mind that Chewie must be within his own range three of the targets, but typically he’ll be further up the field than Leia, so this shouldn’t be an issue for you. I like to consider this card the turning point card for this list. Removing an activation is huge, and it gives you that opportunity. The other reason we want Leia within range of two different targets is twofold: one, as this is a two pip, your opponent could run someone away, and two, Chewie can hopefully either finish them off on his activation or hit the other target if all went well with the first. Use this card to swing the game.

The Change of Plans into Notorious Scoundrels is a classic move, but keep in mind you can return Sorry About the Mess, or Reckless Diversion to your hand also. Both of those cards can be extremely powerful depending on the list you’re playing. Use it to your best advantage as you see fit on the field.

Finally, as discussed above, using Bombard early is a big part of the Strike Teams’ success. Use it wisely and you can really maximize your efficiency on those Hunter upgrades.

 

My RPQ list from April

– Leia Organa (90) + Improvised Orders (10) + Environmental Gear (3) = 103
– Han Solo (120) + Environmental Gear (3) = 123
Operatives:
– Chewbacca (110) + Hunter (6) = 116
Corps:
– 2x Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Rebel Officer (19) = 162
– Rebel Troopers (40) + Z-6 Trooper (22) + Rebel Trooper (10) = 72
Special Forces:
– 3x Rebel Commandos Strike Team (16) + DH-447 Sniper (28) + Hunter (6) = 150
Support:
– 1.4 FD Laser Cannon Team (70) = 70

Total: 796/800

I went 2-1 with this list, and lost my third game in part to time and a couple of misplays on my end (learn to deploy your moisture Vaps to create a disadvantage for your opponent!) and a well timed play by my opponent. This list can shred opponents when wielded properly. It’s a ton of high powered pierce and offense, that needs to be a bit aggressive to win the day. I also love how the FD cannon looks, and it creates a big field for you to play in.

 

Final Notes

Thank you for taking the time to read this! You can find me on the discord as luunta – Jess, and I’d love to answer your questions about this list or any thoughts that may pop up for you. I really love playing variations of this list and using the non-meta units more than other folks. If you’ve ever seen my comments, you’ll know I have huge love for the wookies. My next RPQ will feature them or Pathfinders, two strongly off meta unit choices.

Hope you all enjoyed this guest piece and it’s something I’m sure we can do again! If you have something you want to talk about to the community, let me know! Every voice should be heard.

– GrandAdmiralThrawn